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Thessaloniki

June 1, 2019

Thessaloniki, Greece

It has now been 6 weeks since leaving Ashland. Two weeks getting to and cycling in Arizona and now 4 weeks in Greece.  Still think another 2 or 3 days in Greece before North Macedonia or as the Greeks call it Skopje.  
On the Red bus tour yesterday the commentary often referred to this area of Greece as Macedonia.  That is why the other country is named North Macedonia. There is a long story here about how it is believed that Czechoslovakia took most of Macedonia from Greece which many Greeks like to share.  
As you know by now I seem to keep running into opportunities to meet and enjoy the locals.  As I was cresting a hill in the first, on the road rain there was a group of wheel chair bound elders, a large bus and a 2 vans parked on the side of the narrow road.  At first I thought the bus had broken down but soon learned they were touring a ruin.  
Pedaling into the ruin I was approached by a Dutchman who I learned was a Reformed minister. The group was being sponsored and guided by his congregation on a tour of Macedonia (Greece) Bisenteen ruins.  We talked for a while about the  Bisenteen history and it role in today’s church. He pointed out the site docent saying the docent would talk with me after the group departed.
I walked over the hill top, well maintained site reading the information posts.  Soon the docent and Freddy came over and Freddy asked what language I spoke.  English and maybe little Spanish.  Together they thought I could understand enough of their English to learn the site’s history. Asking me to follow they walked off at a fast pace.  
The site was at first a Bisenteen church, later a Ottoman moask and then a castle. The Blue moask in Istanbul was mentioned as a comparison.   After walking the entire site the docent and Freddy asked me to come to the office to sign the guest book.  We sat and began talking about my time in Greece and their lives.  Freddy is an expat German carpenter who has lived here since 1985.  I do wish I could remember the docent’s name, but no. He moved to the local village about 10 years. 

It has now been 6 weeks since leaving Ashland. Two weeks getting to and cycling in Arizona and now 4 weeks in Greece.  Still think another 2 or 3 days in Greece before North Macedonia or as the Greeks call it Skopje.  
On the Red bus tour yesterday the commentary often referred to this area of Greece as Macedonia.  That is why the other country is named North Macedonia. There is a long story here about how it is believed that Czechoslovakia took most of Macedonia from Greece which many Greeks like to share.  
As you know by now I seem to keep running into opportunities to meet and enjoy the locals.  As I was cresting a hill in the first, on the road rain there was a group of wheel chair bound elders, a large bus and a 2 vans parked on the side of the narrow road.  At first I thought the bus had broken down but soon learned they were touring a ruin.  
Pedaling into the ruin I was approached by a Dutchman who I learned was a Reformed minister. The group was being sponsored and guided by his congregation on a tour of Macedonia (Greece) Bisenteen ruins.  We talked for a while about the  Bisenteen history and it role in today’s church. He pointed out the site docent saying the docent would talk with me after the group departed.
I walked over the hill top, well maintained site reading the information posts.  Soon the docent and Freddy came over and Freddy asked what language I spoke.  English and maybe little Spanish.  Together they thought I could understand enough of their English to learn the site’s history. Asking me to follow they walked off at a fast pace.  
The site was at first a Bisenteen church, later a Ottoman moask and then a castle. The Blue moask in Istanbul was mentioned as a comparison.   After walking the entire site the docent and Freddy asked me to come to the office to sign the guest book.  We sat and began talking about my time in Greece and their lives.  Freddy is an expat German carpenter who has lived here since 1985.  I do wish I could remember the docent’s name, but no. He moved to the local village about 10 years. 

–Bill H.

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